My name is Vivienne Gucwa. I am an artist, creative director, and author of two books: NY Through the Lens and NY in the Snow.

 

This collection of work represents a large portion of imagery (primarily New York City photography),

 

I license my work for film, print, television, and digital use. I also work directly with brands. If you are interested in any of these aspects of my work, send me an email at viv@nythroughthelens.com

 

Twitter + Instagram: @travelinglens

 

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If you wish to contact me regarding my work you can contact me here on Flickr or at photos@nythroughthelens.com.

  

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  • JoinedJune 2006
  • HometownQueens, NYC
  • Current cityLower East Side, NYC
  • CountryUS
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Photos of Vivienne Gucwa

Testimonials

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If I had a nickel for every time a fellow photog has assured me that he or she could make "award-winning" pictures with a shoebox, thumbtack & some electrical tape, I'd carry brand new Leica M8s in my pocket to pass out to panhandlers instead of the odd dollar bill. Vivienne, to the best of my knowledge, has never … Read more

If I had a nickel for every time a fellow photog has assured me that he or she could make "award-winning" pictures with a shoebox, thumbtack & some electrical tape, I'd carry brand new Leica M8s in my pocket to pass out to panhandlers instead of the odd dollar bill. Vivienne, to the best of my knowledge, has never said this. But she's the one I'd actually believe if she did. I mean, consider how challenging it is to take some of the humblest photo gear--cell phone cam or point & shoot---into what is historically one of the most photographed cities in the world, & create images of familiar scenes that are also unfamiliar--new & fresh & utterly inspiring. Take the example of her Doyers Street photo. After displaying an instinctively brilliant sense of composition, Vivienne just lets the soft light do its thing, following the curved alley, petering out gently against the darkening facades. Look at the progression of color in the brickwork, counterpointed by the more vivid awnings. There's some Vermeer-level shit going on here color & light wise. Note the figure of the girl in the white dress who appears to be gazing at the tourists at the far end. Is her left hand held up to her face in apprehension? Or is she talking on her cell? Who cares? The gesture is as elegant as it is eloquent. Finally you see how crappy the tarmac is, rainwater notwithstanding, & there's garbage & recyclables tucked discretely but visibly in the corners: this really is NYC, baby, not some fancy-schmancy studio set maintained by an army of eager photo assistants that you could never yourself afford. It's nothing more than a single, & utterly precious moment in time preserved for posterity by someone who understands that the photographer's most important tools are the ones on either side of her nose. That's just one example. & given that testimonials are recommended to be 100,000 words or less, I won't try to dissect any others. Suffice to say that I first took notice of Vivienne's work when I realized an astonishing sky scape she'd posted here or on tumblr hadn't used a Hasselblad, but rather an iPhone! WTF! Vivienne's work inspires me & it teaches me (at probably twice her age) that there is always a new way to see something, however familiar it might be to you or others. Furthermore, she shows you that even when confronted with a scene that makes you feel as though you're facing Godzilla with a Zippo, you can still give him a pretty good hotfoot. Now that she's gone full-frame sensor I'm honestly exhilarated anticipating how far her esthetic reach will extend.

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September 4, 2013